About Kelly M. Davis Esq.

Kelly M. Davis is the owner of Kelly M. Davis & Associates, LLC. She grew up around the construction industry and knew once she opened her practice she would help construction related businesses.

Fewer filings of mechanic’s liens

Ran across this article this morning: Fewer filings of mechanic’s liens might mean good news for economy — or not

I don’t think there is anything earth shattering in the article, but it is good to see some actual numbers on Mechanic’s Liens being filed.  First, you should probably take into account this is for Houston, so for other parts of the country the trend probably doesn’t apply.  I would think it’s a pretty good representation for the Dallas area though.

Update: This was actually a reprint from the Louisville area.  There is a Jefferson county near Houston and was reading it out of the Houston Journal so assumed it was about the Houston area…missed the part about it being a reprint.

Comments

  1. I like the …or not… 🙂 As with just about anything, this information can be interpreted both ways.

    Kelly – you have any idea where one can find statistics about the number of mechanics liens filed nationwide?

  2. Kelly M. Davis Esq. says:

    I wish i knew of a place to find more statistics, but i have never been able to find one. Since they are filed at the county of residence whoever is compiling the data would have to get it from all the counties. I know some news papers print recaps for the month, so some of it is out there just not in one spot that I have found.

    You may actually have some good data on trends since you file all over the country.

    Most of what I saw in the article for numbers is pretty consistent with what I have seen. The high being in 2008 when the residential building market died. Those were builders with high volumes of properties being built, so the amount of liens are high (i.e. one home builder could be building 250 houses and run into financial problems so 250 properties times X amount of liens adds up). For 2009 there was some spillover from the home builders and that’s when the commercial builders started having more problems. From there it has moved more to Bond claims since most of the larger building projects are government funded.

    I think it would have been good to see the 2006 & 2007 numbers. But as you said how the numbers came to be can be interpreted from either direction.

    I think it is basically a combination of both: less building and what actually is happening is funded and ran by good sound businesses that can pay their bills.

  3. Put me in the “or not” category. I think the lien filings going down is a function of less projects to lien, not better cash flow. That certainly matches with what we are seeing in DC.

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